in which the biologist’s husband is a cuck

I haven’t been to the movies in a long time. Tonight I watched Annihilation at the theatre.

It struck me that more than one of the movies being previewed was about how scary Mexican drug dealers are.

Race doesn’t really come up in the first book of the Southern Reach trilogy. It does in the second. One of the main characters is a black lesbian. The main character is half Latino. The book makes a point to mention microaggressions towards him along the lines of “you’re not like those other Hispanics.”

The point of the book is that the biologist played by Natalie Portman had a husband who went on a top secret mission, appeared out of nowhere sort of like a zombie, then died of cancer. She has to find out what happened to him, so she goes on an expedition to where he’d been. There were few survivors of such expeditions.

In the movie, she’s fucking a black science professor guy while her husband is away and presumed never-to-return. She feels bad about it and kicks him out. He’s remorseless, tacky, pushy. Says he loves his wife.

They placed a black man in the movie to serve no purpose except to represent white military dude’s primordial fear of their wives fucking niggers while they’re on tour. After grinding with satisfaction on some big black cock (if I remember right, there are scenes in bed with her husband but no fucking), she sees the light and goes back to waiting for Mr. Square Jaw.

The movie had trippy stuff. I was titillated. I had a nice time. The price was sitting through racism so mundane I’m not sure how many other people even noticed it’s there. Not to mention the pro-military, pro-CIA plots of a lot of the previews.

Black people seemed overrepresented, because it’s entertainment.

There was some asinine thing that made no sense about a company and some kind of weed pill, and then cartels. There’s absolutely no reason the media couldn’t educate people about how to purchase the right stuff at the cannabis dispensary as it does about how to drink.

This is the reason I keep myself oblivious to a lot of pop culture.

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